Finland Supports EU Commission’s 90% Net Emission Reduction Target for 2040 Climate Goal, with Certain Reservations

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Finland has expressed support for the EU Commission’s proposed 90 percent net emission reduction target for the Union’s 2040 climate goal, with certain reservations. While this reduction target is calculated from the level of emissions in 1990 and will require both emission reductions and carbon removal to achieve, Finland emphasizes that key instruments used to implement it must meet their minimum requirements. This includes proceeding technology-neutrally and accepting nuclear power, as well as creating effective incentives for technical carbon sequestration at the EU level.

The EU’s Environmental Council meeting in Brussels marked the first official discussion of the 2040 climate goal. Many EU member states have not yet formed their positions on this target, making it a starting point for a long process of negotiations. During the meeting, Finland highlighted the importance of cost-effective emission reductions and taking into account uncertainties in the land use sector when implementing future legislation.

Finland recognizes that transitioning industries to green technologies is crucial for achieving emission reductions. This includes transitioning steel factories and refineries away from fossil fuels, which may depend on how pure hydrogen is defined. Additionally, recovering carbon dioxide in forest industry units is a significant issue, as technical sinks play a vital role in achieving net reduction increases in carbon dioxide emissions. Finland views these technical sinks as essential, especially if they aim to increase net reduction by more than five million tons of carbon dioxide emissions.

In summary, while Finland supports the EU Commission’s proposed 90 percent net emission reduction target for the Union’s 2040 climate goal, they are adamant that key instruments used to implement it must meet their minimum requirements. They emphasize cost-effective emission reductions and taking into account uncertainties in the land use sector when implementing future legislation. Additionally, they recognize that transitioning industries to green technologies is crucial for achieving emission reductions and view technical sinks as essential for achieving net reduction increases in carbon dioxide emissions.

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